Policies

HIST - History

HIST 125 World History to 1500 (3)

This course examines the similarities and differences between multiple cultural centers in the Americas, Africa, and Eurasia starting in the Neolithic. Topics will include politics, religion, art, migration, and intercultural interactions. The course concludes with the start of the European "Age of Discovery" in the 15th century. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 126 World History Since 1500 (3)

Starting in 1500, we will investigate the places and events that have helped shape the world in which we live. In particular, we will focus on how groups of people meet and interact. We will look at the connections between Europe, Africa, East Asia, and the New World. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 130 United States to 1877 (3)

A survey of American history from European exploration and discovery through the Civil War and Reconstruction emphasizing political, economic, social and cultural development. The process of emerging problems and solutions will be analyzed. (HP)

 

HIST 131 United States Since 1877 (3)

A survey of American history from the last quarter of the nineteenth century until the Present emphasizing continued national development in political, economic, social and cultural arenas. The process of emerging problems and solutions will be analyzed. (HP)

 

HIST 132 Issues in American History (3)

Addresses the changing interpretations of various topics in American history, as chosen by the instructor, from the colonial period to the present. Promotes the development of analytical thinking and writing and engages in dynamic learning with group discussions and individual presentations. May be repeated with different topics. (HP)

 

HIST 210 History of Modern Europe (4)

This course explores the history of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages until today. The continuous shift between fragmentation and relative unity in economic, political, and social spheres will underpin the class. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 212 World War I and II (4)

A detailed examination of World War I and World War II. The causes, combat, and outcomes of both wars will be discussed. The ultimate goal is to investigate how these two wars shaped the twentieth century. (HP)

 

HIST 213 Russia and the USSR (4)

This course provides a broad overview of the USSR from its creation to its dissolution. We begin by looking at the origins of the Soviet Union in Tsarist Russia and explore the Union itself (politics, economics, and society). Finally, we examine the fallout after the 1991 collapse including Vladimir Putin and the Chechen Wars. (HP)

 

HIST 215 The Balkans: Between East and West (4)

This course provides an overview of the history of the Balkan Peninsula (including the modern Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, and Macedonia among others). In particular, we will look at the region as a meeting point of cultures: Greek and Latin, Christian and Muslim, capitalist and communist. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 216 Germany and Central Europe (4)

Bounded by Germany in the west, Poland in the east, the Baltic Sea in the north, and to the northern Balkans in the south, Central Europe is a geographical space as well as a persistent idea. This course will explore the history of this region from antiquity to the present day focusing on conflict and accommodation. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 217 Contemporary Europe (4)

This course will examine the history of Europe from 1890 until the beginning of the twenty-first century. We will spend a significant amount of time examining how modern European history is one of conflict (World Wars I and II, the Balkan Wars of the 1990s) and division (the Cold War) but also one of increasing unity (the European Union) and the recent current trends towards separatism. Formerly numbered POLS-223. Students with credit for POLS-223 may not also receive credit for HIST-217. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 220 Middle Eastern Civilization (3)

Studies the history of Middle Eastern Civilization from antiquity to the present through an examination of the major political events of the region in both the ancient and modern worlds and with particular interest in its three main religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The course also examines the history of the recovery and reformulation of Classical Greek philosophy and science in the Arab world and studies the influence of Arabic philosophy on the medieval and modern political situation in the Middle East and Europe. (HP, GPC, WRT)

 

HIST 221 Biblical Archaeology (3)

Examines the history, geography and culture of the Bible lands through the study of archaeology. Introduces students to types of material remains and examines the significance of these physical objects for an understanding of the Bible. Although students are introduced to a range of scientific methods that are used by the archaeologist, as a Humanities course the examination of specific methods and discoveries are related to larger patterns of textual, historical and human interest. The course is typically taught with a focus on either the Old Testament or New Testament periods. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 230 Colonization and American Revolution: 1607-1787 (4)

Examines the major influences in the development of national values and institutions from the Age of Discovery and Exploration and the Colonial Period through the American Revolution and the drafting of the Constitution in 1787. (HP)

 

HIST 231 American Expansion and Civil War: 1787-1877 (4)

An examination of the major political, social, economic and cultural trends in the United States from its constitutional beginnings through Reconstruction. Major topics will include early national development, Jacksonian Democracy, Manifest Destiny and expansion, and slavery and the sectional crisis leading to the Civil War. (HP)

 

HIST 232 America’s Rise to Power: 1877-1945 (4)

Examines the transformation of the United States from Reconstruction through World War II when the nation evolved from isolation and pre-industrial values and institutions to a modern country characterized by industrialization, immigration, urbanization and international diplomacy and warfare. (HP)

 

HIST 233 The Fifties and Sixties: U.S. History: 1945-1975 (4)

An examination of the major political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic trends from World War II through the end of the Vietnam War and Richard Nixon’s presidency. Major areas of consideration will include the Cold War at home and abroad, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam, the New Left and the Counterculture, the Women’s Movement, and Nixon’s presidency. (HP)

 

HIST 234 Recent United States: 1975- Present (4)

An examination of the major political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic trends from the post-Watergate era through the present. Major areas of consideration will include the rise of the New Right in politics and culture, the limits of the American economy, Carter diplomacy, the impact of the Middle East Hostage Crisis, Ronald Reagan and the Cold War, the end of the Cold War, the New World Order, the computer and communications technology revolution, the 2000 presidential election, the impact of 9/11/01, and the wars with Iraq. (HP)

 

HIST 235 The Immigrant Experience (3)

An overview of patterns and issues in immigration history and in the acculturation of immigrants to American society. Primary, but not exclusive, focus on Iowa. Includes case study, personal investigation of and contact with an immigrant individual, family or group. (GPC)

 

HIST 237 American Environmental History (4)

Environmental history studies the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. This course examines American history through the lenses of conservation, environmentalism, geography, philosophy, public policy, and technology. Consequently, American history looks very different when seen in environmental context. (HP, GS)

 

HIST 250 Latin American Civilization (4)

A survey of Latin American history, culture and politics from 1500 to the present, with a focus on Mexico and Peru – the two most diverse countries in Spanish-speaking America. Students read extensively in primary and secondary sources on these two countries, and also conduct research a topic of individual interest in Latin America. (HP, WRT, GPC)

 

HIST 271 History of Modern China (4)

Surveys the history of China from the Qing Dynasty to the present with special emphasis on social, economic, political, and cultural issues in Modern China. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 275 History of Modern Japan (4)

Studies Japan’s development toward modern statehood in the 19th century and continues with the economic, social, cultural and political life of 20th-century Japan. (HP, GS, GPN)

 

HIST 276 Early East Asian Civilization (4)

Explores the historical foundations of Asian civilization from the earliest times to the l5th century with special emphasis on China and Japan. Students who have received credit for HIST 170 may not enroll in or receive credit for HIST 276. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 277 Modern East Asian Civilization (4)

Explores the development of Asian civilization from the l5th century to the present with special emphasis on comparing the histories of China and Japan. Students who have received credit for HIST 171 may not enroll in or receive credit for HIST 277. (HP, GPN)

 

HIST 280 Modern African Civilization (4)

An interdisciplinary survey of cultures and life in modern Africa. Emphasis on sub-Saharan African history, art, political economy, women, development and society. Explores sustainability principles across cultures, historical time periods, and societies. (HP, GS, GPN)

 

HIST 310 Studies in World History (4)

Prerequisite: second-year standing. Addresses the changing interpretations of various topics in world history, as chosen by the instructor, from ancient times to the present. Promotes the development of analytical thinking and writing and engages in dynamic learning with group discussion and individual presentation. May be repeated with different topics. (HP)

 

HIST 330 Studies in American History (4)

Prerequisite: second-year standing. Addresses the changing interpretation of various topics in American history, as chosen by the instructor, from the colonial period to the present. Promotes the development of analytical thinking and writing and engages in dynamic learning with group discussions and individual presentation. May be repeated with different topics. (HP)

 

HIST 485 Historiography Seminar (4)

Prerequisite: instructor’s permission. Examines the nature of historical inquiry and methodology over time. Includes discussion of recent issues in the field of History.

 

HIST 486 History Research Seminar (4)

Prerequisite: instructor’s permission. This course is designed to help students learn how to do sophisticated historical research, read and interpret primary and secondary source materials, and write a formal research paper in a scholarly manner. (WRT)

 

HIST 497 Internship: Public History (Arr)

Prerequisite: instructor’s permission. These are off-campus experiences designed to enrich a student’s education through supervised practical experience in the field of public history. This can include work in the area of museum studies, archival theory and practice, historical preservation, oral history and local history. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

HIST 499 Independent Study-History (Arr)

Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.