Policies

Chicago Semester Courses

The following courses are offered to Central students studying in Chicago through the Chicago Semester program, which serves students through a consortium of colleges and universities. Interns choose two courses (Arts in the City, Diversity and Inequality, Urban Planning or Values and Vocation) along with an internship. Student teachers do not choose courses, but participate in a seminar related to student teaching.

 

EDUC 453C Advanced Integration of Technology in Education-Elementary (1)

This course will be taught on-line through Central College. Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program. A continuation of EDUC 250 for elementary education. Focuses on instructional technology strategies, educational pedagogy, educational philosophy and research, and a wide variety of instructional technologies. Emphasis on learning how to plan, design, and integrate technologies into teaching and learning. The ethical and equitable use of instructional technology is discussed and demonstrated by students. Designed for students seeking K-6 licensure. Taken concurrently with EDUC 460.

 

EDUC 455C Advanced Integration of Technology in Education-Secondary (1)

This course will be taught on-line through Central College. Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program. A continuation of EDUC 250 for secondary education. Focuses on instructional technology strategies, educational pedagogy, educational philosophy and research, and a wide variety of instructional technologies. Emphasis on learning how to plan, design, and integrate technologies into teaching and learning. The ethical and equitable use of instructional technology is discussed and demonstrated by students. Designed for students seeking 6-12 licensure. Taken concurrently with EDUC 470.

 

EDUC 460C Elementary Student Teaching (12)

Prerequisite: blocks 1, 2 and 3 and approval of the teacher education committee. Students will observe, assist and teach in elementary school classrooms under the guidance of the classroom teacher, the school principal and the college supervisor. Taken concurrently with EDUC 485. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

EDUC 470C Secondary Student Teaching (12)

Prerequisite: approval of the teacher education committee. Students observe, serve as teaching assistants and take responsibility for teaching in grades 7-12 under the guidance of their college supervisor, the classroom teacher and the school principal. Taken concurrently with EDUC 451 and 486. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

EDUC 485C Senior Seminar in Elementary Education (2)

Prerequisite: approval of the teacher education committee. A capstone course integrating research, theory and application of concepts and skills in the field of education. Each student will develop and present a professional portfolio and an action research project at the conclusion of student teaching, and will engage in a variety of planned professional development opportunities. Taken concurrently with EDUC 460 or EDUC 462 and EDUC 466. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

EDUC 486C Professional Development Seminar-Secondary (2)

Prerequisite: approval to student teach. A capstone course integrating research, theory and application of concepts and skills in the field of education. Each student will develop and present a professional portfolio. This course is taken concurrently with student teaching. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

FA 200C Arts in the City (3)

This course investigates urban cultural life as reflected in the arts of Chicago. Students will attend plays, concerts, movies, and visit art galleries. We will process these experiences through readings, lectures, and classroom discussion as we explore how Christians engage culture. (ART)

 

GENR 200C Digital Media and Social Entrepreneurship (3)

This course helps Chicago Semester students enrolled in the new summer entrepreneurship track develop a Christian perspective on the ethical, cultural, and pragmatic concerns arriving with the emergent field of social entrepreneurship. (Summers only)

 

GENR 385C Diversity and Inequality: Engaging Chicago Cross Culturally (3)

This course introduces students to the culture, history, assets, and challenges of Chicago neighborhoods. Students will examine their own social and cultural locations and compare and contrast how their stories are similar to or different from the Chicago racial and ethnic landscape. (GPC)

 

GENR 386C Urban Planning, Development and the Sustainable City (3)

This course explores the evolution and development of the city, with particular emphasis on the built environment in Chicago. Students will explore the significance of the city’s architecture, sculpture, parks, community murals, and impacts of city design. Students will seek to understand and critique the city’s built environment through field trips, guest speakers, readings, and class discussions. (GS)

 

GENR 387C Social Justice Seminar (3)

This course will introduce students to major streams of social justice thought, including the history of the criminal justice field and contemporary movements for social justice. We will examine the role of race, poverty, and inequality in people’s experiences of the criminal justice system in the U.S. As a class we will discuss how marginalization, segregation, and the lack of access to social resources influences people’s experiences of justice. We will also explore two major issues related to justice: mass incarceration and mass eviction. Finally, through conversations and visits with practitioners, advocates, and organizers we will look at models of restorative justice and how communities address issues related to injustice. (GS)

 

GENR 397C Chicago Internship (9)

This field education internship experience gives students hands-on practice experience in the knowledge and skills learned in major courses. Students develop a learning contract for focused areas of development and learning and are mentored and supervised at the site by professional staff with experience in the area of practice. Students are also supervised by Chicago Semester staff through a weekly professional seminar course and through midpoint and final site visits. Taken only on the Chicago Semester program. Pass/No Credit basis.

 

PHIL 286C Values and Vocations (3)

This course explores from a variety of perspectives on the concept of vocation. Drawing on readings from religion, theology, and sociology, students will examine the ways in which we discern our calling in light of our responsibility to engage the common good. Students will also look at social structures that impact work and family life (gender, race, religion, and class) and how they might shape our understanding of vocation.